Malcolm Finlayson

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Malcolm Finlayson was born on June 14, 1930 in Alexandria. Malcolm loved football and played for his School and the local boys brigade teams. By the time he was 11 he was playing for under -17 year age teams. At 15 he played three times as a trialist for Dumbarton and three times in Celtic reserves.

He was spotted playing for Renfrew Juniors by Millwall's scout, and was invited for a trial with London Club. He signed terms with Millwall in February 1948 and quickly made his league debut against West Bromwich Albion on February 28 aged 17. He remained with the Lions for six full seasons in the Third Division. In one notable game against Walsall, he was taken to hospital with the team losing 1-3, only to return patched up during the second half and play on to help the side to a 6-5 win. He was first choice at the Den, making 251 appearances in total, a figure that would likely have been higher but for his time serving National Service.

He was sold to First Division Wolverhampton Wanderers in August 1956 for £3,000, primarily as cover for England international Bert Williams. He managed to make 13 appearances in his first season at Molineux, and his performances earned him the first choice spot during the 1957/58 season as the club won the league title.

Malcolm kept his place the following season as he picked up yet another league title winners' medal. He added an FA Cup winners' medal when Wolves defeated Blackburn Rovers 3-0 in the 1960 final. The club's domestic success also gave Finlayson the opportunity to play in the European Cup against the likes of Barcelona.

Finlayson lost his place to Fred Davies for the 1962/63 season and spent two seasons largely in the reserves before announcing his retirement in May 1964 after playing 203 games in total for Wolves.

After his playing retirement, he went on to become a successful businessman in the Midlands. He also spent a brief spell back at Wolves as vice-chairman during 1982. Malcolm now divides his time between his homes in Rhu and Stourbridge.